Resumes or CVs ? And when you are asked for examples for “inspiration”…?

Once it was clear which side of the Atlantic you were on when you heard some words which came from an American background, such as Trash, or British, such as Lift. Now it is not so clear and I have noticed that it can be common to use the two very separate words of CV or Resume interchangeably.  However rather than dwelling on the changes one item brought to my attention was a copy of the Complete Idiot’s Guide to the Perfect Resume  by Susan Ireland.  Rather than the book, which was well written and thought provoking,  interesting me, it was the blurb promoting the linked website that went with it at  http://susanireland.com  I found curious.  Thinking it would probably just be a advertising site promoting the book it does actually have a lot of info about how to do your Resume, (or CV if you prefer as we are in the UK) and also guidance on the sort of questions you may be asked in job interviews. Probably not that unusual to similar sites in the UK so far, however one interesting section is “Career Options” which has some useful Labour Market Information (LMI) on a range of jobs in the states. Again this info can be found in the UK but often it is spread around various other websites.  There is a lot happening in the UK currently about merging such data and I do feel we are coming to a time when having a range of data in one place but gathered from a range of sources will be the norm.  I believe the term is Mashups but currently these are only of interest to a few dedicated people in research areas, or the most enthusiastic New Social Media types. However this can change quickly when things get a critical mass and erupt into view of everyone. Here’s looking to the near future !  (and if you do want to know the difference between a CV and Resume a useful summary can be found here http://www.greatcvs.co.uk/ResumeVersusCurriculumVitae.html although you should not put either word on your actual CV according to these people ! http://blog.workthing.com/2010/04/twenty-things-to-leave-off-your-cv.html )

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A website to help research your study subject

This is the first in an occasional series of websites which I’ve found useful (but are not always well known about). I’ve found this website a useful resource. It can be used with students  who might just have got their GCSE results and are now looking to go onto 6th form study, possibly considering which subjects they might finally take. Or you could use it with students looking at a Diploma or another vocational or occupational course that would still allow them to go onto a degree should they choose. Alternatively a student might be halfway through their studies and now faces completing the UCAS form to apply to University. What help is available for them ?
If you have every wanted to find out about a subject in more depth you probably use the internet, but it can be difficult to find useful, reliable info about a chosen career area even if you use Google. Well now there is a website which has gathered the best of the web for you, and arranged this over the main subject fields covering degree areas from Aeronautical Engineering to Womens Studies. Have a look at this and see if it helps progression with  career choices http://www.vts.intute.ac.uk/
There is even an Internet Detective course available to help you sort out the gold from the dross http://www.vts.intute.ac.uk/detective/ Everything is free and quality controlled by a national team of lecturers and librarians from UK universities. An excellent resource I think

Which is the best University to study History in ?

If you are an adviser this is often the sort of question you get which can trigger a long and involved discussion. Whilst valuing the need to talk it might be useful to use some impartial source to get some ideas and facts first. In an ideal world what would we want ? Well somebody such as UCAS, which covers all applications to undergraduate study in the UK and another group such as the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) would be a good pairing. If they could show the information on a website that you could look at yourself it would be great. Well now you can. Click on www.unistats.com and you will be able to compare student satisfaction, job prospects, Degree class and progression and what students were doing 6 months after graduation plus even more info. Interesting reading and you can still ask the original question anyway, but it might provoke an even more interesting discussion !  And in case you were wondering…the question to the answer is, or course,  best in what way ?

Explore Higher Education and see the world !

Sometimes you just wonder if there is more out in the big wide world than you are aware of. This can be about holidays, people, and places to visit or, as this is a blog about Higher Education, universities! You may have heard about the Russell Group of universities in the UK, comprising 20 research intensive institutions which have quite a high media image, but have you heard of their equivalent in other countries? Such as the Australian ‘Group of Eight’, the Canadian ‘Group of Thirteen’, the American Ivy League institutions or the Universitas 21, which is a group of universities from 11 countries?   There are other groups of Universities in the UK, such as the 1994 Group and the Millions+ group of course, but these are not shown on this map…yet

Apart from being useful to know in case these questions ever come up in a quiz they can help you be aware of the wider world of HE which you might want to consider. Some degrees in the UK can include time abroad as part of your study. Some uni’s may have links with other institutions abroad which you could benefit from. If you like league tables, of which there are many, the QS World University Ranking lists even more.

Normally this would primarily be of interest to those who like long lists but a helpful fellow in Germany has plotted the location of the Top 100 universities in both the QS World University Rankings and the Shanghai Jiao Tong exercise on a friendly, interactive Google map to be found here. http://www.university-rankings.net . All the other university groupings mentioned above can also be viewed on this website.